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Home > Education >LCD Digital Unit Information

Drawbacks of LCD


LCD technology still has a few drawbacks in comparison to some other display technologies:
While CRTs are capable of displaying multiple video resolutions without introducing artifacts, LCDs produce crisp images only in their "native resolution" and, sometimes, fractions of that native resolution. Attempting to run LCD panels at non-native resolutions usually results in the panel scaling the image, which introduces blurriness or "blockiness" and is susceptible in general to multiple kinds of HDTV blur. Many LCDs are incapable of displaying very low resolution screen modes (such as 320x200) due to these scaling limitations.
Although LCDs typically have more vibrant images and better "real-world" contrast ratios (the ability to maintain contrast and variation of color in bright environments) than CRTs, they do have lower contrast ratios than CRTs in terms of how deep their blacks are. A contrast ratio is the difference between a completely on (white) and off (black) pixel, and LCDs can have "backlight bleed" where light (usually seen around corners of the screen) leaks out and turns black into gray. However, as of December 2007, the very best LCDs can approach the contrast ratios of plasma displays in terms of delivering a deep black.
LCDs typically have longer response times than their plasma and CRT counterparts, especially older displays, creating visible ghosting when images rapidly change. For example, when moving the mouse quickly on an LCD, multiple cursors can sometimes be seen.
Some LCDs have significant input lag. If the lag delay is large enough, such displays can be unsuitable for fast and time-precise mouse operations (CAD, FPS gaming) as compared to CRT displays or smaller LCD panels with negligible amounts of input lag. Short lag times are sometimes emphasized in marketing.
LCD panels using TN tend to have a limited viewing angle relative to CRT and plasma displays. This reduces the number of people able to conveniently view the same image �laptop screens are a prime example. Usually when looking below the screen, it gets much darker; looking from above makes it look lighter. Many panels such as 22" and 24" LCDs which are based on the IPS, MVA, or PVA panels have much improved viewing angles; typically the color only gets a little brighter when viewing at extreme angles.
Consumer LCD monitors tend to be more fragile than their CRT counterparts. The screen may be especially vulnerable due to the lack of a thick glass shield as in CRT monitors.
Dead pixels can occur when the screen is damaged or pressure is put upon the screen; few manufacturers replace screens with dead pixels for free.
Horizontal and/or vertical banding is a problem in some LCD screens. This flaw occurs as part of the manufacturing process, and cannot be repaired (short of total replacement of the screen). Banding can vary substantially even among LCD screens of the same make and model. The degree is determined by the manufacturer's quality control procedures.
The cold-cathode fluorescent bulbs sometimes used for back-lights contain mercury.